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Friday, April 2, 2010

lots of Adam Rudolph news


 

here's a couple posts about Adam Rudolph -


Adam Rudolph’s Moving Pictures
This March and April, Rudolph will tour the East Coast with a brand new edition of his Moving Pictures Quintet and Octet.Rudolph originally founded the group in the late 1980s as a vehicle for his explorations of what would later come to be known as “world music,” a field he has been exploring since his first recordings in the 1970s.
Rudolph recently received his second Chamber Music America “New Works” commissioning grant. On this tour, Moving Pictures will be performing the premiers of his new compositions.

The new lineup features veteran bassist Jerome Harris, the saxophonist and multi-instrumentalist Ralph Jones, the trombonist and percussion player Joseph Bowie (brother of the late Lester Bowie) and percussionist Matt Kilmer.  Members of the ensemble continuing in the current incarnation include cornetist/flugelhornist Graham Haynes, guitarist Kenny Wessel and the Moroccan-born oudist/percussionist Brahim Fribgane. Together the musical credits of theses artists span the entirety of contemporary instrumental music from Ornette Coleman to L. Shankar.
Great improvisers can create scintillating music in any situation or setting. But as Adam Rudolph can attest, the ability to transcend music and achieve something truly profound requires a sort of mysterious chemistry that comes along in precious few instances over the course of a musician’s lifetime.
ADAM RUDOLPH BIO
Born in 1955, handrummer, percussionist, composer, multi instrumentalist and improviser Rudolph has been hailed as “a pioneer in world music” by the New York Times. Currently he composes for his groups Moving Pictures, Hu: Vibrational, and Go: Organic Orchestra, a 15 – 50 piece ensemble for which he has developed an original music notation and conducting system. Over the past 25 years he has developed a unique syncretic approach to hand drumming in creative collaborations with outstanding artists of cross-cultural and improvised music, including Don Cherry, Jon Hassel, L. Shankar, Pharaoh Sanders, Fred Anderson, Hassan Hakmoun and Wadada Leo Smith among others.

ADAM RUDOLPH UPCOMING MOVING PICTURES TOUR DATES



Friday April 2, 2010
Firehouse 12, New Haven, CT

Moving Pictures Quintet with Adam Rudolph, Joseph Bowie, Graham Haynes, Kenny Wessel, Brahim Fribgane

Saturday April 3, 2010
Puffin Foundation, Teaneck, NJ

Moving Pictures Quintet with Adam Rudolph, Joseph Bowie, Graham Haynes, Kenny Wessel, Brahim Fribgane
 
Friday April 9, 2010
The Painted Bride, Philadelphia, PA

Moving Pictures Octet with Adam Rudolph, Joseph Bowie, Graham Haynes, Ralph Jones, Matt Kilmer, Kenny Wessel, Jerome Harris, Brahim Fribgane
 
Saturday April 10, 2010 City Winery, New York, NY presented by World Music Institute
Moving Pictures Octet with Adam Rudolph, Joseph Bowie, Graham Haynes, Ralph Jones, Matt Kilmer, Kenny Wessel, Jerome Harris, Brahim Fribgane

New Meta Releases
 
Great improvisers can create scintillating music in any situation or setting. But as Adam Rudolph can attest, the ability to transcend music and achieve something truly profound requires a sort of mysterious chemistry that comes along in precious few instances over the course of a musician’s lifetime
 
“We can’t underestimate the element of alchemy,” Rudolph says.
 
With a pair of new releases on his own Meta Records label, the master percussionist celebrates two decades-long partnerships in which he’s found just that kind of alchemy. On Towards the Unknown, the string section from Rudolph’s Go: Organic Orchestra is woven into a concerto for the percussionist and legendary saxophonist Yusef Lateef; Rudolph is then featured in a second concerto, composed for him by Lateef and featuring thirteen members of the S.E.M. Ensemble conducted by Czech composer Petr Kotik. And with Yeyi, Ralph Jones employs an arsenal of woodwind instruments to complement Rudolph’s percussion battery in a wide-ranging, deeply spiritual dialogue.

Rudolph and Jones’ partnership dates back more then thirty years to the 1974 Ann Arbor Blues and Jazz Festival, where they performed on a bill that also included Sun Ra and James Brown. They were brought together by trumpeter Charles Moore, with whom they later cofounded the Eternal Wind Quartet. Lateef invited Eternal Wind to perform with him in 1988, sparking a fruitful collaboration that has now evolved over more than two decades
 
“I feel the most complete sense of understanding with Ralph and Yusef,” Rudolph says, “which means that we have a profound kind of freedom. We understand each other on a creative level and on a philosophical level. I like to work with musicians who understand what I’m doing, not just musically but metaphorically.”



Released to celebrate NEA Jazz Master Lateef’s 90th birthday year, Towards the Unknown showcases the deep understanding forged by Rudolph and Lateef over the past 21 years through concertos that each composed for the other in very different ways but with equally evocative results. Lateef’s “Concerto for Percussion” is perhaps one of the first concertos ever composed specifically for hand drums. It provides a dense, tension-filled score meant to serve as a launching pad for Rudolph’s improvisations. Throughout the work’s two movements, Rudolph engages the chamber orchestra in a lively conversation full of varied colors and surprising digressions.
 
“Yusef wrote this piece for me as a point of inspiration,” Rudolph explains. “It’s an invitation to delve into something deeper and to respond to what I heard. It’s like dialoguing with Yusef, but his expression is the colors of the orchestra rather than him playing at that moment. I didn’t want to in anyway cover up the beauty of his orchestration, but Yusef said wanted that idea of several different realities happening at once – like a collage.”
 
On the night of the concerto’s world premiere, Lateef was scheduled to read a few of his poems accompanied by Rudolph’s percussion. That reading turned into a lengthy and typically entrancing duo improvisation that now serves as the raw material for Rudolph’s “Concerto for Brother Yusef.” One of those poems, the yearning “Springfield Program Rewards Good Works,” survives in the final movement, “A Better Day”, while the opening piece, “First Train”, contains an improvised primal blues sung by Lateef and inspired by Rudolph’s sintir. A tapestry intertwining that duo material with the eleven strings from Rudolph’s Go: Organic Orchestra, conducted via cued improvisational concepts, the concerto is thus something of a collage of spontaneous elements.
 
“There are a lot of reasons that are inexplicable and mystical about why my orchestration works with Yusef,” Rudolph says. “It has to do with breath and timing and knowledge, but it’s also the manifestation of this long-term musical and creative exchange that we’ve had over the last 21 years.”
 
Rudolph’s exchanges with Ralph Jones dates back almost fifteen years further. He refers to Jones as “the greatest woodwind player you may not have heard of,” and the description is apt. Jones’ wide-ranging career has included recordings and performances with the likes of Lateef, Pharaoh Sanders, Ahmed Abdul Malik, Ella Fitzgerald, Wadada Leo Smith, Ken Cox, Detroit’s MC5, and his own group, The Seekers of Truth Revolutionary Ensemble.
 
In addition, he has performed in Rudolph’s ensembles Moving Pictures and the Go: Organic Orchestra. The intuitive language that the two improvisers have developed over their lengthy collaboration is fully in evidence on Yeyi. Subtitled “A Wordless Psalm of Prototypical Vibrations”, the CD is an offering of thanks, a communion with the natural world both outer and inner.
 
“It’s not trying to evoke nature itself so much as evoking naturalness,” Rudolph says. “The natural state of who we are, the real us as spiritual beings. You can still strive to be in tune with your naturalness in the 21st century, living in New York City.”
 
“Yeyi” refers to the yodeling of the Mbuti pygmies, one of the oldest indigenous people of Africa. Mbuti inspiration on the music is twofold, according to Rudolph: one is in the communal harmony with nature towards which the artists strive, and the second is in the legacy of a culture that has rippled outwards to Kongo and from there over continents and generations, through to the African-American musical influences that Rudolph and Jones draw upon.
 
Over the course of the ten explorations that make up Yeyi, Rudolph and Jones draw from a pool of shared knowledge – musical studies, each other’s music languages, their own prior interactions – to communicate with a penetrating and intuitive intensity.
 
“Over our long history of performance and research together we have created an extensive body of compositions and rhythmic and intervallic approaches that we can call upon,” Rudolph says. “And those elements are present in a pure, deconstructed form so that we can construct and orchestrate them any way we imagine to - in the moment - based upon listening to each other.”
 
Those common elements include a variety of musical traditions, including African and Indonesian music, and raga, and compositions both traditional and original, as when the two revisit “Oshogbo”, the Rudolph’s composition that they performed on the first Moving Pictures Cd in 1992 and which opened Dream Garden, the most recent release by Moving Pictures. Disparate influences can also cross-streams, as when Jones conjures the traditional spiritual "Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child" on the Ney, a Middle Eastern flute.
 
Returning to the subject of that sonic alchemy that these two recordings so amply demonstrate, Rudolph likens the discovery of a musical soul mate to a romantic one. “You could list of reasons why you marry someone, but it comes down to a feeling. It’s something that you know from the get-go but also something that develops over time. Ultimately it’s a mystery.”
 
Born in 1955, handrummer, percussionist, composer, multi instrumentalist and improviser Rudolph has been hailed as “a pioneer in world music” by the New York Times. Currently he composes for his groups Moving Pictures, Hu: Vibrational, and Go: Organic Orchestra, a 15 – 50 piece ensemble for which he has developed an original music notation and conducting system. Over the past 25 years he has developed a unique syncretic approach to hand drumming in creative collaborations with outstanding artists of cross-cultural and improvised music, including Don Cherry, Jon Hassel, L. Shankar, Pharaoh Sanders, Fred Anderson, Hassan Hakmoun and Wadada Leo Smith among others.
 
ADAM RUDOLPH UPCOMING TOUR DATES

Thursday April 22, 2010
University of Illinois-Champagne-Urbana

Yeyi - Adam Rudolph/Ralph Jones Duet

Friday April 23, 2010
The Velvet Lounge, Chicago, IL

Yeyi - Adam Rudolph/Ralph Jones Duet

Saturday April 24, 2010
Mexicains Sans Frontieres, Grand Rapids, MI
presented by Blue Lake Public Radio
Yeyi - Adam Rudolph/Ralph Jones Duet
 
Sunday April 25, 2010
Kerrytown Concert House, Ann Arbor, MI

Yeyi - Adam Rudolph/Ralph Jones Duet
 
Monday April 26, 2010
Oberlin College, Fairchild Chapel , Oberlin, OH

Yeyi - Adam Rudolph/Ralph Jones Duet

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